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Important Aspects of Level Design...
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 4:48 am
   Subject: Important Aspects of Level Design...
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This was started by JudgeXYZ on the old Dome forums...perhaps you guys know any more, or can put them to use...
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 4:49 am
   Subject: Important Aspect of Level Design: Structure
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Structure is the organisational basis behind the way rooms are formed and arranged. First we need to be clear about what a room is. Here's a definition.

"A room is an empty space surrounded by walls whose only entrance or exit is through a door."

That means you can't walk out of (or into) a room without opening a door first. Also, you can't enter one room without leaving another room at the same time. And finally, any two rooms you can travel between are always next to each other.

Now that we're clear on what a room is we can get specific about the way rooms are formed and arranged.

Rooms are formed using these fundamental constructs:

a) the square (an empty space shaped like a square),
b) the rectangle (like the square but longer in one direction),
c) the corner (leads into two different directions),
d) the T-junction (leads into three different directions) and
e) the intersection (leads into four different directions).

Every room you see in a Wolf3d level is built out of those constructs. The size of those constructs depends on how many cells you use to build them. For example, the smallest square is built out of a one cell, the next smallest square is built out of four cells and the next smallest square after that is built out of nine cells. Alot of the rooms in Wolf3d levels are built out of a single construct. The first six rooms in E1L1, for example, are built out of single constructs (the square, the rectangle and the T-junction).

Usually rooms in Wolf3d levels are designed with symmetry in mind (see the ghost level - E3L10). Sometimes rooms are designed with an identity in mind (see the swastika maze - E6F3).

Rooms in Wolf3d levels are often arranged depending on the objectives of the mission. For example, it may be necessary for the player to obtain a key before gaining access to the main elevator room. In that case there must be a single door which leads the player to the main elevator room, but which cannot be opened without the key.

In some cases rooms are arranged around a main central room. This is clearly demonstrated in E2L1 where all rooms (except the secret rooms and the elevator room) are connected to the massive central room.

Many other interesting (and bizarre) arrangements are possible. In E6L10 (secret floor) the rooms are grouped into four quadrants, which were designed as if individual levels by two different authors. In E6F3 (the swastika maze) the rooms are packed together a continuous pattern.

Well that pretty much covers the design aspect of structure in Wolf3d levels. Hopefully the reader has gained a better understanding of how structure is used to create good Wolf3d levels. Perhaps then the reader may be serious enough to study the levels alone. Look at the levels you like and ask the question, "Why to I like this level?". Find the answers.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 4:49 am
   Subject: Important Aspect of Level Design: Audibility
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Audibility dictates how guards should react when the player makes a noise in another area. For example, you can fill two different rooms with the same floor code so that when you're killing guards in one room the guards in the other room are alerted to your presence. If guards are deaf then floor codes have no effect.

Since there are no situations in which you would want more than one type of floor code in a single room, the only question we need to ask is, "When do two different rooms use the same floor code?". Once we have answered that question our floor code settings are taken care of.

Firstly, it shouldn't be surprising that we would use different floor codes for rooms which are a far distance apart. Only when rooms are near each other (or next to each other) would they possibly use identical floor codes.

Secondly, some surfaces block sound more than others do. Wood, for example, blocks sound much less than brick does. Therefore we should make the behaviour of sound between rooms more realistic by taking these surfaces into account.

So when do two different rooms use the same floor code? Two rooms share the same floor code when the walls between them do not block the transfer of sound.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 4:50 am
   Subject: Important Aspect of Level Design: Texture Selection
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Here a wall is a four-sided solid block, which takes up the space of a single cell. You will never see two walls side-by-side with clashing textures in a well-designed Wolf3d level. Often the level designer will have to use doors to hide these clashes. The only time you will see clashing textures in a well-designed Wolf3d level is when the level designer has decided not to use doors to cover them up. In these instances the level designer must ensure that the clashes are made perpendicular to each other; i.e., that the walls whose textures clash are made corner-to-corner and not side-by-side.

The other side of texture selection is concerned with interior design. The most interesting levels often use various types of textures like wood, stone and brick. Signed walls (walls with pictures and messages on them) are also used to add variety to a level. These are all artistic considerations.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 4:53 am
   Subject: Important Aspect of Level Design: Symmetry
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Looking at many of the levels in original Wolfenstein I see alot of symmetry in the way the geometry is laid out. Human beings love symmetry. To the human brain symmetry is beautiful because it's easy to visualise. You know when you say a lady is easy on the eyes? In the same way we say symmetry is easy on the mind.

We shall employ a method of achieving symmetry in our map geometry. The simplest symmetrical model that can be designed in Wolfenstein is the plain rectangular room. The rectangular room is symmetrical along four different lines. They are the horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines which pass through the center. We are going to use the rectangular model as the basic framework on which we design all other rooms. That's step one.

STEP 1: Make a rectangular room.

The rest is just adding on to that framework without destroying the symmetry of the room. To do so one must mirror every addition about each of the four lines of symmetry. For example, if I put a column at the top of the room, I should put a column at the bottom as well. If I put a floor lamp in the upper left corner of the room, I should put three in each of the remaining corners. That's step two.

STEP 2: Make incremental changes to the room while maintaining symmetry.

You will probably want to make a compromise by not mirroring all your additions over all four lines of symmetry. That can be an effective way of adding character to a room and avoiding a boring level. That's step three.

STEP 3: Add more to the room without creating all four symmetrical reflections.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 4:53 am
   Subject: Important Aspect of Level Design: Item Population
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Good levels have enough ammunition and health for the player to be able to work with. If there are too many guards to kill and not enough ammo or health to kill them with then the player will most likely not enjoy the level (probably because he/she ends up losing). That makes my first rule.

RULE 1: Supply ammunition and health appropriately for the difficulty of the level.

Ammunition and health items should be grouped into clusters of items which can be easily obtained all in one go. The same applies for treasure items. It is undesirable to have small amounts of ammunition scattered few and far between in a large room. That makes my second rule.

RULE 2: Group ammunition, health and treasure in clusters.

Keys are heavily guarded rare items usually penetrating deep inside a dungeon or labrinth. Keys often appear at dead ends in long chains of rooms and door ways. That makes the third rule.

RULE 3: Place keys in well-defended areas which take time and effort to reach.

Finally, items found in secret areas have little reward when those items are in abundant supply already. That's the last rule I have.

RULE 4: Make secret areas worth looking for by rewarding the player with items not already supplied outside the area.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 2:43 pm
   Subject: Re: Important Aspects of Level Design...
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I always liked the idea behind these series of tips from judgexyz, but I can't really say that I really feel that what he describes in necessary. For one thing, I think he takes a more technical approach and makes basic ideas seem much more complex than they really are. The other problem I have is that no guide emphasizes the two elements that go hand-in-hand which I think are most important - variety and fun. No one is going to want to play a level that is boring. That's why it's important to not only vary the textures every once in awhile, but vary the shapes, sizes or rooms and vary the linearity (if that is a word...lol) of the layouts themselves. Also, finding interesting new object and guard placement makes the experience more enjoyable for the player. Face it, there's very little that hasn't been done before in some form. That's why it's extremely important to have those two elements in order to make good maps. Beyond that, it's just a matter of preference and ideas...

Of course, you have to learn the rules first to break them. This should give people a good idea of how to start making decent maps.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 08, 2003 6:02 pm
   Subject: Now it's like this just happened yesturday...
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Yup. This may sound kinda odd, but I found Jack's comments alot more interesting than Judgexyz's. It's fun to vary the walls, shapes, objects, enemy types and strategies throughout the rooms/levels - giving the player new and interesting perspectives. You can't go around telling everyone "this is the way it is", because everywhere you look (tv shows, fashion, music, the making of WOLFENSTEIN 3d) - there are people who are getting praised for bending the rules a little. I believe that I still have some of our quotes from this tread on my computer, ahhh - here they are... Smile

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Schabbs1
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(1/6/02 4:39:45 pm)
Reply Re: The importance of good level design...
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I agree about good level design. You can have all the good graphics, source code changes etc that you want but if the levels are not designed well then the game will soon be forgotten once the initial novelty wears off.

Chokster37
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(1/11/02 8:26:51 am)
Reply The importance of good level design...
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I don't think it's my place (or anybodys) to say what is the most important aspects of a great addon. Everyone likes their own thing, and it's that variety that makes the world interesting. Nate is into Source Code features... while Tristan is more concerned with realistic graphics. So, yeah, different things, intersting eh? I guess it's more about understanding the pashion the creators had while they made the addon than simply judging their work, comparing it to other games. The harder they tried to do what they wanted, and the more interested they were in their own personal adventures, the funner the game can be. I see people all the time... just mimicing everyone else, or doing what other people think is the right thing to do. There's people like Poet who explain that you must stick to the original design, and people like Brent who believe there's no point in making an addon unless it's totally different. Many people even have different opinions about what IS good level design. Have you ever let someone who doesn't know anything about Wolfenstein make a wolf3d level? The ideas they come up with sometimes are amazing, looking at some of the stuff my cousins and the kids I babysat made. Giant tunnels of doors that lead into rooms made out of barrels and guards walking backwards into each other?!? There's an enormous amount of people that would agree that you have to make Wolfenstein-style levels, but not everyone. So before you can say that good level design is very important, you have to think: "what really is good level design?". It blows my mind that someone could just NOT understand how a level with doors and guards everywhere could be just as fun as a level with "made to look like wolf3d" rooms; but just like in real life --- people like to dismiss anything that is "weird" or "unusual" as bad. I'm not saying that everyone who judges Add-ons are like this, just the ones who talk about Quality Level Design. They've all got their little snotty outlook on "what makes a level good". Nobody needs a GUIDE to make good levels, they need ambition... they need creativity, they need to like what they're doing. And level design can be all of your addon, some of your addon, or none of your addon. Whatever you desire. If you like extra ketchup and pickles on your hamburger... go ahead, if you want just a plain bun --- great! I'm not here to brainwash people into thinking into what is the right way to think, and if the lack of any opinion in this message makes it pointless --- than so do all opinions in the universe. Because eventually, you'll either realize how to open your mind to the infinate possibilities for every situation that can possibly exist - or you will die. Smile

Master of the mundane
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(1/13/02 3:47:18 pm)
Reply Re: The importance of good level design...
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Yeah, I think you're right, it just didn't come off right. I define "good level design" as just being fun. It can have the original atmosphere or not, as long as I get enjoyment out of playing it.

Awhile ago on the Vault, Barry had said things to the effect of "don't bother straying from the original Wolfenstein atmosphere, it's too much work", and I really didn't like that comment. As long as it's fun, it doesn't matter to me....

tvanputten
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(1/21/02 10:08:07 am)
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Re: The importance of good level design...
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For me, good level design is that you make levels that make you feel proud. Let me explain that a little. I'm, as Chris says, very "into" graphical appearance. That doesn't mean I breathe VSWAPs all day, neither does it mean I desparately want all pixels in the game changed to my liking, hell no.

I have my own way of level design. As far as I can go, I add things that could have been in a German castle. OK, crazy levels like E3L10 are fun, but I think they only suit secret levels. I've basically been "brought up" with BJ Rowan's Level Design Tips, and I make my levels by that document(I don't read it all the time, I've read it once or twice and printed all rules in my mind ). I like walls that match up and "dress" the level, not a grey stone wall stuck within red brick walls. I know, it's fun to do that, but it's just not my thing.

I call my style of level design "decent". I've always called my stuff "decent", since it's just a matter of taste what you like. But my level design certainly is like the original Wolf, since... no matter how hard you try,there's always the original atmosphere(even if you screw it up). You can't just stray away from it.

Put together, good level design is just a word with a different meaning for everybody. And only because of that, add-ons differ from each other. Imagine when we only had Totengraeber-like add-ons and nothing else . Then you wouldn't have a preferrable type of level design, would you?

judgexyz
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(1/22/02 5:07:32 pm)
Reply Re: The importance of good level design...
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There are fundamental rules to the rules that must be followed in order to create the maps that happen to replace the original levels from the original Wolfenstein 3D (copywrited by id software) and Spear of Destiny (also copywrited by id software). First the t-junction must interconnect with the y-axis and the vertex of the parabola must be symmetrical to the x-intercept(s), in which half the middile term of the quadratic equation y=3x^2+2x-6 is equal to the first and second terms squared and combined with each other - also known as connecting the rooms with a door.

(this quote might have been 'slightly' altered by Jack Ryerson a.k.a. Master of the Mundane... lol)

Chokster37
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(1/23/02 7:19:38 am)
Reply Re: The importance of good level design...
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Well, that's great that you can talk Alien Language. But, as everyone said before, "realistic" isn't always the most creative way to look at things. Why can't a room have 5 directions?!? People can draw diagonal lines and angles you know, and there's always mazes that spin off in 20 different paths and are connected by only a door. All of these variations still follow your desciption of a room, but you said that every room in Wolfenstein 3d follows 5 "fundamental constructs". What about the Angel of Death level? That doesn't even have doors or exits, but it's still a room. And why does three directions have to be called a T-juntion? What about E-junctions, or Y-juntions?!? Bleh...

"I get the impression from one or two of you guys that you can spray your walls and doors in any old way to make a good level."

Errr, the "oldest" wolfenstein levels were created by ID Software for original wolfenstein 3d. So you must be saying that we use ideas from the original levels just as often as we use new ideas to make levels, right? I agree with your statement than, because everyone who plays the original levels remembers some of that stuff when they start making their own levels; so it would be pretty hard to make a level without using any "old ways", haha. Anyways, we all have our own logic behind what we do; your way isn't better than anyone elses... you should focus more on expressing your thoughts as opinions, rather than just dictating to us that "this is the way it is". We're humans too you know, sillybrain..

"And finally, any two rooms you can travel between are always next to each other."

Hey! If you can travel "between" them, than they can't be next to each other; there's obviously some kind of gap inbetween them. Lol, I'm not even gonna get involved in the Elevator and the Spear of Destiny in this one...

I thought your description of audibility was interesting; like the sound travel in Wood vs. Brick rooms! But I disagree with that other part, because there ARE situations when someone could want more than one floorcode in a room. Maybe YOU would never want this, but other people might. I was so happy when I found out that you could run past that torturous part on E6L1 without the officers even noticing you just by landing on a certain area. There's many instances in Chokage where more than one floorcode is used in a room, and they can add many new tricks to the game. For instance, if you place the block that you start the level on with a different floorcode than all the other blocks; you can become invisable and alert guards in secret areas by shooting before you open a door. You can also turn guards into statues, or make their bullets useful only in certain parts of the room. Furthermore, you can trick people into thinking enemies are objects by turning a still picture of them into an object and putting them on a different floorcode, in the direction that the object would appear... and when you open a door, the object will spring into life. There's also the unbelievably mind boggling idea that you could place a guard backwards on a different floorcode as the room you're in, and than make a room on the other side of the level that appears to be exactly the same; but in reality has the guard on the same floorcode as you, and as you look at the guard on the different floorcode frontwards, it transforms your presence to the the side of the level where the guard is actually on the same floorcode as you, but you never noticed what has happened because you didn't even know the first guard was on a different floorcode than you because he is replaced by the second guard who is on the same floorcode as you, and the room is exactly the same except for the invisable barries (also created by using more than one floorcode in one room) that can only be accessed by not looking at the first guard entirely, trying to shoot him at an angle, than running through the rest of the perplexing room backwards. Another thing to note is that a door with a deaf guard floor code and an unwalkable-object on the same position makes the unwalkable-object LOOK like an unwalkable-object, but this object can become transparent once you figure out either the floorcode to an enemy on the other side that can open the object for you, or find the floorcode that makes it so you can open two doors at once and figure out to control it to open the door of your choice, which will actually be an object in this case. Boy, would you love it if I made a "just levels" set! lol.

I loved hearing Tristan's side of the story, because it wasn't really a side; it was just a little glimpse into his own pashions for level design. Scary lines like: "Imagine if we only had Totengraeber-like add-ons and nothing else" really make you think. Sorry, but even my three year old cousin knows stuff like: "a rectangle is like a square but longer in one direction". AHAHAHAHAHA! I think the Pineapples have gotten to Jason... Smile

judgexyz
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(1/24/02 6:07:36 am)
Reply Important Aspects of Level Design...
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I hope you weren't too intimidated by my approach in trying to describe what a well-designed Wolf3d level is. I see that you feel like I'm putting up a superior position when all I'm really doing is describing the quality of the well-designed Wolf3d level. Perhaps I should have made that more clear but I didn't expect anyone to take it so seriously.

Your first criticism was about my 'Alien' language. You seem to think that my language was unnecessary. I was only trying to be as precise and clear as possible. I wasn't trying to confuse the reader.

The statement, "Any two rooms you can travel between are always next to each other," was incorrect. You pointed out the error with my use of the word 'between' (thanks for pointing that out) but the other mistake I made was that I forgot about embedded rooms (where one room entirely surrounds another).

At least you had one positive thing to say. You said you liked my audibility idea about how sound is blocked more or less by different types of surfaces (like wood and brick, etc). Oh well...

Chokster37
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(1/24/02 11:36:18 am)
Reply Important Aspects of Level Design...
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lol, actually I think your descriptions were pretty interesting. It's cool that you put so much thought into every aspect of level design, and were trying to give readers a clear idea of what you're referring to by giving us simple terms we can relate to. I just wanted to test you, to see what you'd say when faced with ideas that conflict with your own. Surprisingly, you took it very well; and were quick to render new possibilities, even if what I said didn't make much sense sometimes. The reason I used "complaining" as a basis to build new ideas was because it seems to draw the reader's attention more than complimenting does; and it can help me judge the recipiants character better (once they respond).

When I wrote that stuff about Alien Language, it didn't really have anything to do with the words you were using to explaining yourself; it was morely about the personality inside. I think, as humans, people should talk to one another in a fun sort of way. Maybe there are lifeforms on other planets that are way more emotionally advanced; but I feel that with robots, computers and all the seriousness in classwork and jobs, that our human mind needs to connect with the things we love in a more friendly and imaginative sense. I know that I wouldn't be as interested in a "Racing Through Wolfenstein" guide if it was all about describing the polygonal matrix of speed and reflex fluxuation when turning left and sliding towards a door. But than again, it could be interesting to know the equation if you were to create a robot to race against when playing through Wolfenstein 3d. There could easily be alot of people who like Wolfenstein 3d for it's scientific principles, and many that like Wolfenstein 3d for it's creativity. But overall, it's the combination of both elements that makes the game interesting. You seemed to be writing mostly about the science, which is still cool; but... considering that there is no known object that possess only emotional attributes, and there are many resources besides humans themselves that carry knowledge; it's safe to say that people have an overly imaginative mixutre of science from emotions, and when they create things, like "Wolfenstein 3d" --- they use their emotions to make people laugh, become surprised, and feel different moods... but at the same time, they make the game understandable using many sciencific ways. I think people who stray to one end of this seasaw are straying from the nature of humanity, and those who only appear to one of the two elements mentioned above could possibly be Extra-terrestrial! And that's where I got the line from...

But, considering that I'm way more of a creative than scientific person... the feeling of Jason being an Alien seems more apparent in myself than it would in any normal person. But, taking things the other way, I suppose that it's quite possible that people like Jason could think I'm an Alien as well! lol Cool

========================================
Don't know where the hell this next quote came from, but it's in the same file as the other ones (I have like 500 full length txt files on in my wolf3d/text folder relating to emails, forum and club discussions, etc. from the last 2 years that I found intersting -- haha):

Great! Life doesn't have a point, so why should addons? I don't think the guys who created Commander Keen went to Mars to research the possibility of warm temperatures and examine the gravitational upload of a pogo stick before they released the game to the public. Some things don't have to make sense, for instance; everything! This logic could be used for any situation, and not just for addons. You don't have to eat, but you won't live --- but you don't have to live, so you don't have to eat... right? And the word pointless has no point either, because it specifially states that it is point-less. That's like trying to stab someone with a sphere! Sure, you can try to papercut someone with a two dimensional circle... but you'll soon realize that there's still no point to that, because if there was than it wouldn't be a circle to begin with. But in another sense, you could tell someone: "you have a point there!" if they're carrying a circle, because a circle in it's "entirety" can be used as a period to end a sentance; which people often refer to as a "point". But there's also the possibility that you could be playing some kind of sport, and very often... you'll have to perform a certain action with a sphere to recieve a point; which is ironic, considering that spheres don't even have a --- oh nevermind.

Hey, if meatloaf can explode... and cows can explode; than what came first --- the bacon or the pig? This floor is squeaking; there must be Mice DJs in my shoe... they're rapping about something like kidnapping us and transforming us into humanpads for their new cheezy PCs?!? Nooooo, please let me finish this sentance Mr. Mous--- mmmm mmmm

"I'm not CRAZY!!!" says 6 out the 9 voices in my head.

*talking with tape on your mouth is hard, did you know that my cousin could sing "Jerimia was a bullfrog" through her nose? oh yeah, I forgot; I can't talk anymore... uhhh, so here's an interesting site: http://d1.blogspot.com *
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 09, 2003 9:09 am
   Subject: Level design
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Chris wrote:
There's people like Poet who explain that you must stick to the original design


According to Chris I have "explained" something like that. That is as far from the truth as it can get. I haven't said anything like that anywhere.

Anyone who has played my sets and/or read my level design tutorial or the hint manuals for my sets will know that my level design ideas, philosophy and technique are entirely different from the original levels, or any others.

I never rush the level design part of a game. I usually start by sitting back, closing my eyes and letting the mind flow, imagining scenes and actions, and developing puzzling situations in my head. Then I start working on it, putting it all together, making all the details fit, and fill in the gaps. Very much like writing a mystery story.

One of the most important things in level design in my opinion is how you make the playing of the level develop. Give both the player and the enemies different paths to follow, and in such a way that the player always may end up surrounded or victim to an ambush. Have enemies coming unexpected at the player or following him behind walls, so he can hear them open doors but not see them etc. to create tension.

How the levels develop is not only important for creating the gameplay but in my opinion also the most important element in creating atmosphere.

Creating new features by editing the source code is a great thing in itself, but especially so if you can make it influence directly on the design. Like having to blow up a barrel to wake up a deaf guard round a corner to make him start moving and open a locked door for you in another part of the floor.

I always let the level contours have a regular shape, square or circular etc. Often subsequent levels have the same contour with elevators in corresponding spots to create a realistic castle feeling.

Fundamentally there is in fact two different methods to start the actual outlining of the levels. From what I have seen most people including Id software use the one method, whereas only a few, including me, make use of the other. I won't give away exactly what these are, it would be interesting to see if anybody know what I'm thinking about.

Paal Olstad (Poet).
Chris
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2003 8:29 am
   Subject: My alter ego speaks to yours...
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Yeah, heh... those above quotes were from over a year ago, but for some reason - I still have this clear recollection of you posting messages somewhere (I think it might have been 'Wolfenstein 3d Fanclub' or an old forum) where you were talking about level design in a 'don't deviate beyond what they do in wolfenstein' approach. I don't know; maybe you've changed over the years, maybe I misinterpreted everything you said, or maybe it was someone else entirely (our good friend pablo_dicter perhaps?)... but that's what I remember.

Anyways, I'm sorry if that comment was offensive in any way. I believe that I was just trying to explain how great it is to see everyone have their own unique approach to things... and from what you've just told me - you're obviously not the kind of person I thought you were. Two other people on here have told me that your style of level design is actually alot like mine, and I must say; that, plus everything you've just said, has got me pretty fascinated to check out some of your work! Smile

Good to hear from you again,

Chris
p.s. Your explanation of 'beginning to create a level' was interesting. I'll read it in more depth in a minute, but from what I've read so far... I'm guessing it has something to do with either the base of the level (the playing field being all walls or a border with empty floorcodes), the relation between guards, objects, walls, and floorcodes (which order you create them in) or the actual rooms that are drawn first (start position, elevator, middle hallways; etc.)...
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2003 12:19 pm
   Subject: Re: My alter ego speaks to yours...
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Chris wrote:
...or maybe it was someone else entirely (our good friend pablo_dicter perhaps?)...


Bingo. I do actually remember pablo saying that himself. Poet's levels have always been very creative and original in terms of design, so that's why I've always been a little puzzled about that. I guess you just confused the "p's".

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2003 3:49 pm
   Subject: Re: Important Aspects of Level Design...
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What add-ons has Judgexyz made? I'd like to play them to see if he's onto something or just spouting a lot of pretty words.

Did he make Perfect Darkenstein? Confused Or was that DagleyKD?
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2003 3:28 am
   Subject: Re: Important Aspects of Level Design...
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Chris, your guess was right about what I termed the two fundamentally different ways of starting the actual outlining.

1. Starting with all walls, and then drawing the rooms and corridors.

2. Starting with an empty floor, and then drawing the walls.

Paal.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2003 4:09 am
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Hey Paal! Very Happy Good to see you around here! Cheers from Holland Laughing
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